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Chess Genius (ChessGenius),
a series of chess engines by Richard Lang, written in x86 assembly language for the 16-bit MS-DOS operating system, as successor and port from Lang's dedicated 68000 based Mephisto Vancouver program incorporating small improvements [1]. Chess Genius 4 in 1995 became a 16-bit Windows program [2] with a GUI developed by Adrian Millett [3] written in C [4], which further evolved to a multi-engine GUI via Chess Genius 6 (6.5) to the Millennium Chess System [5], and the Chess Genius Classic GUI [6]. Chess Genius was further ported to various PDA and mobile platforms, such as Palm and Apple's iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes Store [7] , as well as Android.

In November 2015, Chess Genius, ported to the ARM Cortex-M processor, was released as dedicated Millennium ChessGenius.
Chess Genius for DOS [8]

Screenshots

genius3d_third.jpg
genius1third.jpg

ChessGeniusAndroid.png
Chess Genius Classic 7.1 for Windows [9]

ChessGenius for Android [10]

Intel Grand Prix

In 1994, during the Intel Grand Prix Cycle [11] in London, Chess Genius, operated by Ossi Weiner, won a speed chess game (25-minutes per side) against Garry Kasparov [12] and drew the second game, knocking Kasparov out of the tournament. This was the first match that Kasparov ever lost to a computer. In the next round, Genius then beat Predrag Nikolić, but then lost to Viswanathan Anand [13] [14] [15] [16] .

[Event "Intel Chess Grand Prix"]
[Site "London (England)"]
[Date "1994.08.12"]
[Round "1"]
[White "Garry Kasparov"]
[Black "Chess Genius"]
[Result "0-1"]
 
1.c4 c6 2.d4 d5 3.Nf3 Nf6 4.Qc2 dxc4 5.Qxc4 Bf5 6.Nc3 Nbd7 7.g3 e6 8.Bg2 Be7
9.O-O O-O 10.e3 Ne4 11.Qe2 Qb6 12.Rd1 Rad8 13.Ne1 Ndf6 14.Nxe4 Nxe4 15.f3 Nd6
16.a4 Qb3 17.e4 Bg6 18.Rd3 Qb4 19.b3 Nc8 20.Nc2 Qb6 21.Bf4 c5 22.Be3 cxd4
23.Nxd4 Bc5 24.Rad1 e5 25.Nc2 Rxd3 26.Qxd3 Ne7 27.b4 Bxe3+ 28.Qxe3 Rd8 29.Rxd8+
Qxd8 30.Bf1 b6 31.Qc3 f6 32.Bc4+ Bf7 33.Ne3 Qd4 34.Bxf7+ Kxf7 35.Qb3+ Kf8
36.Kg2 Qd2+ 37.Kh3 Qe2 38.Ng2 h5 39.Qe3 Qc4 40.Qd2 Qe6+ 41.g4 hxg4 42.fxg4 Qc4
43.Qe1 Qb3+ 44.Ne3 Qd3 45.Kg3 Qxe4 46.Qd2 Qf4+ 47.Kg2 Qd4 48.Qxd4 exd4 49.Nc4
Nc6 50.b5 Ne5 51.Nd6 d3 52.Kf2 Nxg4+ 53.Ke1 Nxh2 54.Kd2 Nf3+ 55.Kxd3 Ke7 56.Nf5+
Kf7 57.Ke4 Nd2+ 58.Kd5 g5 59.Nd6+ Kg6 60.Kd4 Nb3+ 0-1
Game and short analyze on Lichess.org : https://fr.lichess.org/BhO7GmBH

See also


Publications


Forum Posts

1993 ...

1995 ...

2000 ...

2005 ...

2010 ...

2015 ...


External Links


References

  1. ^ Eric Hallsworth (1992). Chess Genius. Selective Search 43, pp. 7, pdf hosted by Mike Watters
  2. ^ Staff (1995). An Interview with Richard Lang. Computer Chess Reports Vol. 5 No. 3+4 pp. 63
  3. ^ ChessGenius Classic 7.0 - The Chess Program that beat Kasparov!
  4. ^ Richard Lang (1995). Chess Genius 4. Computer Chess Reports Vol. 5 No. 3+4, pp. 80
  5. ^ Schachclub Leinzell - Schach + PC - Shredder 5, Teil 1 by Peter Schreiner (German)
  6. ^ ChessGenius Classic 7.0 - The Chess Program that beat Kasparov!
  7. ^ Chess Genius for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad on the iTunes App Store
  8. ^ Septober - Computerschach by Herbert Marquardt
  9. ^ ChessGenius Classic 7.0 - The Chess Program that beat Kasparov!
  10. ^ ChessGenius for Android
  11. ^ GM Magazine: Vol. 12 Intel Grand Prix London 1994 {DVD} by GM Daniel King
  12. ^ Matches by Ed Schröder
  13. ^ Intel Rapid Chess Grand Prix 1994 - London from chessgames.com
  14. ^ Garry Kasparov vs Chess Genius (1994) from chessgames.com
  15. ^ ChessGenius - Famous game - Wikipedia
  16. ^ Kasparov, Garry 2805 - Genius 3, Intel World Chess Grand Prix London (1) 1994 D23, 0-1 [Hertneck,G] from Schachcomputer.info Wiki (German)
  17. ^ Re: Farewell of chess programmers by Thorsten Czub, CCC, September 15, 2005

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