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Eliot Sanford Hearst, (July 7, 1932)
an American psychologist with a Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1956 under William N. Schoenfeld, distinguished professor of psychology at Indiana University, Columbia University, and the University of Arizona, chess player and USCF Master, and in the 60s chess columnist at Chess Life. Eliot Hearst won the New York State Championship in 1950 and went on to become one of the best chessplayers in the USA in the 50s, and was participant in the US Championship tournaments in 1954 and 1961 [1]. His 1977 contribution Man and machine: Chess achievements and chess thinking in Peter W. Frey's Chess Skill in Man and Machine [2] evaluates the status of computer chess at that time from the perspective of someone very knowledgeable with the game [3].

Rosenwald Tournament 1956

Eliot Hearst holds the distinction of defeating Bobby Fischer in the final round of the October 1956 Rosenwald Tournament [4], just three rounds after Fischer had played his "Game of the Century" against Donald Byrne [5]:
[Event "Rosenwald Tournament"]
[Site "New York"]
[Date "1956.10.24"]
[Round "11"]
[White "Robert James Fischer"]
[Black "Eliot Sanford Hearst"]
[Result "0-1"]
 
1.e4 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.Bb5 Bc5 4.O-O Nd4 5.Nxd4 Bxd4 6.c3 Bb6 7.d4 c6 
8.Ba4 d6 9.Na3 Nf6 10.Re1 Qe7 11.Bg5 h6 12.Bh4 g5 13.Bg3 h5 14.f3 h4 
15.Bf2 g4 16.Nc4 g3 17.hxg3 hxg3 18.Bxg3 Nh5 19.Bh2 Bc7 20.Ne3 Qh4 
21.Qd2 Bd7 22.Bb3 Rh7 23.Qf2 Qg5 24.Rad1 Nf4 25.Bxf4 exf4 26.Nf5 O-O-O
27.Kf1 Rh2 28.Bxf7 d5 29.Rd2 Rf8 30.Qg1 Rh7 31.exd5 Rhxf7 32.dxc6 Bxc6 
33.d5 Bb5+ 34.Ree2 Rxf5 35.Qxa7 Rxd5 36.c4 Bxc4 37.Qa8+ Bb8 38.Rc2 Rc5 
39.Ke1 Bxe2 40.Qa5 Qg3+ 0-1

Photos

Columbia College Chess Team

ColumbiaCollageTeam1952.jpg
The Columbia College chess team of 1949–1952 after a radio match with Yale.
Right to left: James Sherwin, Eliot Hearst, Carl Burger, Francis Mechner [6]

Marshall Chess Club

bobbyfischer_eliothearst.jpg
Bobby Fischer and Eliot Hearst, a casual game in August 1962 at the Marshall Chess Club [7]

Blindfold Chess

Hearst's and John Knott's book on Blindfold chess [8] [9] was the winner of the Fred Cramer Award for the Best Chess Book of 2009 [10], sponsored by the U.S. Chess Federation, the Chess Journalists of America [11], and the U.S. Chess Trust [12]. A review was published by Hearst's fellow and former Columbia College chess team member Francis Mechner in 2010 [13]. The blindfold champions quoted by Hearst and Knott describe what they do in these terms:
  • no mental pictures
  • abstract knowledge
  • I know where the pieces are
  • only an abstract type of representation
  • only relationships
  • no real picture
  • the significance of a piece
  • knowing what combination or plan is in progress
  • lines of force
  • pieces are only friend or foe, carriers of particular actions
  • sort of formless visions of the positions

Selected Publications


External Links


References

  1. ^ Mysterious Nailbiting - Part 2, Chess.com
  2. ^ Eliot Hearst (1977). Man and Machine: Chess Achievements and Chess Thinking. Chess Skill in Man and Machine
  3. ^ Chess Skill in Man and Machine (Paperback) from amazon.com
  4. ^ Third Rosenwald 1956 - Nailbiting!, Chess.com
  5. ^ Robert James Fischer vs Eliot Sanford Hearst (1956) from chessgames.com
  6. ^ Image from Francis Mechner (2010). Chess as a behavioral model for cognitive skill research: Review of Blindfold Chess by Eliot Hearst and John Knott. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Vol. 94, No. 3, pp. 373-386, pdf, (Courtesy of the Columbia University Archives)
  7. ^ Hearst vs. Bobby Fischer by Andrew Hearst, son of Eliot Hearst
  8. ^ Eliot Hearst, John Knott (2008). Blindfold Chess: history, psychology, techniques, champions, world records and important games. McFarland & Company
  9. ^ Blindfold Chess: History, Psychology, Techniques, Champions, World Records, and Important Games
  10. ^ Award Winning Chess Books
  11. ^ CJA -- Chess Journalists of America
  12. ^ U.S. Chess Trust
  13. ^ Francis Mechner (2010). Chess as a behavioral model for cognitive skill research: Review of Blindfold Chess by Eliot Hearst and John Knott. Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, Vol. 94, No. 3, pp. 373-386, pdf
  14. ^ A Chess Glossary
  15. ^ Alexandra Kosteniuk's Chess Blog | Funny chess definitions for a chess Wednesday!
  16. ^ William N. Schoenfeld from Wikipedia
  17. ^ Blindfold Chess: History, Psychology, Techniques, Champions, World Records, and Important Games

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