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Raymond Merrill Smullyan, (May 25, 1919 - February 6, 2017 [1])
was an American mathematician, logician, philosopher, magician, pianist, and Professor Emeritus of Philosophy from Indiana University Bloomington. He held a Ph.D. in mathematics on the theory of formal systems from Princeton University under advisor Alonzo Church [2]. Smullyan was author of fourteen books and of numerous research articles on the topics of mathematical logic, first-order logic, set theory, theory of computable functions, recreational mathematics, mathematical games and puzzles, retrograde chess problems, and Eastern philosophy. He has been a contributor to Scientific American [3].
Raymond Smullyan [4]

See also


Selected Publications

1959

1960 ...

1970 ...

1980 ...

1990 ...

2000 ...

2010 ...


External Links

Smullyan

A Mathematical Mystery Tour

  1. Proof Beyond Doubt 2:51
  2. The Language of Abstraction 12:20
  3. Discovery or Invention 19:18
  4. Playing the Numbers 22:13
  5. The Taming of the Infinite 25:37
  6. Contradictions and Paradoxes 29:22
  7. Incomplete Future 40:20

References

  1. ^ Mathematician and puzzle-maker Raymond Smullyan dead at 97 by Hannah Osborne, International Business Times, February 10, 2017
  2. ^ The Mathematics Genealogy Project - Raymond Smullyan
  3. ^ Raymond Smullyan | Department of Philosophy | Indiana University Bloomington
  4. ^ Smullyan Portraits, McTutor History of Mathematics
  5. ^ first-order logic from Wikipedia
  6. ^ George Boolos (1996). The Hardest Logic Puzzle Ever. The Harvard Review of Philosophy. Vol. 6, pdf
  7. ^ Knights and Knaves - Wikipedia
  8. ^ Smullyan Problem in Sherlock Holmes book by Christopher Heckman, rgcc, January 18, 2013
  9. ^ Retrospektive (Retroanalyse) from German Wikipedia, Raymond Smullyan, Manchester Guardian, 1957
  10. ^ inspired by Frank R. Stockton (1882). The Lady, or the Tiger? The Century Magazine
  11. ^ Tiefes Wasser, Der Spiegel 32/1982 (German)
  12. ^ Epistemology from Wikipedia
  13. ^ Gödel's incompleteness theorems - Wikipedia
  14. ^ Metamathematics from Wikipedia
  15. ^ Continuum hypothesis from Wikipedia
  16. ^ Raymond Smullyan introducing retrograde analysis in the game of chess
  17. ^ Smullyan Problem in Sherlock Holmes book by Christopher Heckman, rgcc, January 18, 2013
  18. ^ Joop van Oosterom from Wikipedia

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