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Cognition,
the mental process of knowing, including attention, remembering, reasoning, understanding, intuition, awareness, and perception. Cognition is studied in cognitive science and various disciplines such as linguistics, neuroscience, psychology, philosophy, anthropology and artificial intelligence [1] . Cognitive psychology, coined by Ulric Neisser in 1967 [2], is the study of how people or intelligent agents perceive, recall, learn, think, speak, and solve problems.
Fields of cognitive science [3]

Cognition in Chess

In 1946, Adriaan de Groot conducted a number of ground-breaking experiments in the cognitive processes that occur in the brains of strong chess players, and defined four stages of the thought process. Perception in Chess was researched by Herbert Simon, William Chase, Ivan Bratko, Peter Tancig, Simona Tancig, Fernand Gobet, Peter Jansen and others, related to chess and computer chess, and how computer chess programmers may adopt techniques from human thought processes.

Perception


Programs


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Forum Posts


External Links

Cognition

Cognitive Architectures

Chess

Misc


References

  1. ^ Cognition from Wikipedia
  2. ^ Ulric Neisser (1967). Cognitive Psychology. Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York
  3. ^ Derivative work: Charles Lowe, Cognitive science from Wikipedia, originally adapted from: George Armitage Miller (2003). The cognitive revolution: a historical perspective. TRENDS in Cognitive Sciences, Vol.7, No.3, pdf
  4. ^ Chess and Education: A Bibliography (pdf) from US Chess Trust
  5. ^ Moscow 1925 chess tournament from Wikipedia
  6. ^ Rosenblatt's Contributions
  7. ^ The Human Intuition Project: Chase and Simon (1973) Perception in chess, Cognitive Psychology 4:55-81. A scientific blunder by Alexandre Linhares, October 01, 2007
  8. ^ Alexandre Linhares, Anna Elizabeth T. A. Freitas (2010). Questioning Chase and Simon's (1973) “Perception in chess”: The “experience recognition” hypothesis. New Ideas in Psychology, Vol. 28, No. 1
  9. ^ K-line (artificial intelligence) from Wikipedia
  10. ^ Chessville - Reviews - The Psychology of Chess Skill - by Dennis H. Holding - Reviewed by Rick Kennedy
  11. ^ Patanjali from Wikipedia
  12. ^ Fernand Gobet, Herbert Simon (1998). Pattern recognition makes search possible: Comments on Holding (1992). Psychological Research, Vol. 61, pdf
  13. ^ Dennis H. Holding (1992). Theories of Chess Skill. Psychological Research, Vol. 54, No. 1
  14. ^ Fernand Gobet, Guillermo Campitelli, Andrew J. Waters (2002). Rise of human intelligence Comments on Howard (1999). Intelligence, Vol. 30
  15. ^ Fernand Gobet (2007). Chunk hierarchies and retrieval structures: Comments on Saariluoma and Laine. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 42. pdf
  16. ^ Robert W. Howard (1999). Preliminary Real-World Evidence That Average Human Intelligence Really is Rising. Intelligence, Vol. 27, No. 3
  17. ^ Pertti Saariluoma, Tei Laine (2001). Novice construction of chess memory. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, Vol. 42, No. 2
  18. ^ Eliot Hearst, John Knott (2008). Blindfold Chess: history, psychology, techniques, champions, world records and important games. McFarland & Company, amazon.com
  19. ^ William Chase, Herbert Simon (1973). Perception in chess. Cognitive Psychology, Vol. 4, No. 1, pdf
  20. ^ A computer program to identify beauty in problems and studies, ChessBase News, December 15, 2012
  21. ^ Cognitive network - Wikipedia
  22. ^ Default mode network - Wikipedia
  23. ^ Large-scale brain network theory - Wikipedia
  24. ^ Cortical column - Hubel and Wiesel studies - Wikipedia

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