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Delphi,
a programming language dialect of the Object Pascal programming language, a branch of object-oriented derivatives of Pascal, mostly known as the primary programming language of Embarcadero Delphi, formerly CodeGear Delphi, Inprise Delphi and Borland Delphi , designed and implemented by Anders Hejlsberg, the creator of Turbo Pascal. As a chief architect at Borland , Hejlsberg secretly turned Turbo Pascal into an object-oriented application development language, complete with a truly visual environment and superb database-access features. Developer Danny Thorpe chose the name Delphi, in reference to the Oracle at Delphi.

Delphi provides an Integrated development environment for Microsoft Windows applications. Delphi pioneered in rapid application development by introducing an application framework and visual window layout designer that drastically reduced application prototyping times of GUI and Database applications. Delphi XE [1] is now part of Embarcadero RAD Studio [2], including C++Builder and UML modeling [3], still supporting x86 inline assembly [4]. A former Linux version of Borland Delphi, called Kylix discontinued. In 2009, Embarcadero announced 64-bit, Linux and Mac OS support [5] [6] .
John Collier - Priestess of Delphi [7]

See also


Delphi Engines

Dynamic list with tag 'delphi'. Engines (at least some versions) written in Delphi or parts in Pascal.

Publications


Forum Posts


External Links


References

  1. ^ Delphi from Embarcadero - RAD Application Development Software
  2. ^ RAD Studio (Common)
  3. ^ UML Modeling from RAD Studio
  4. ^ Inline Assembly Code (Win32 Only) from RAD Studio
  5. ^ RAD Studio, Delphi and C++Builder Roadmap
  6. ^ Delphi XE3 | Develop Windows 8 Metro Apps | Create Mac App from Embarcadero Technologies
  7. ^ Priestess of Delphi by John Collier 1891, Oil on canvas, 1893 given to the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, by the Earl of Kintore, Wikimedia Commons, Pythia from Wikipedia
  8. ^ FastMM | Free Development software downloads at SourceForge.net

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