Home * People * Mark Watkins
M_Watkins.jpg

Mark James Watkins,
an American mathematician affiliated with the School of Mathematics and Statistics [1], University of Sydney, and member of its Computational Algebra Group [2]. In computer chess forums, Mark Watkins is well known under the pseudonym "BB+" as an expert poster and publisher of recognized papers concerning the Rybka controversies (both Ippolit and then Fruit). In February 2011, Mark Watkins disbanded his anonymity when involved in the ICGA Investigations regarding Fruit and Rybka.
Mark Watkins [3]

Solving Losing Chess

Since late 2011 Mark Watkins worked on his long-term goal to weakly solve the game of Losing Chess, presumably by showing that 1. e3 wins for White. As of summer 2014 [4], leaving b6 and c5 as the remaining Black responses [5], all other responses to 1.e3 are indeed White wins, along with earlier work done by Ben Nye and others, as demonstrated by Proof-Number Search combined with Endgame Tablebases. On February 02, 2015, 1. e3 c5 was announced solved, on October 10, 2016, 1. e3 b6, proving 1.e3 wins [6].

Selected Publications

2000 ...

2010 ...


Forum Posts

2010 ...

2011
2012
2013

2015 ...


External Links


References

  1. ^ School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Sydney
  2. ^ Computational Algebra Group
  3. ^ M_Watkins - USyd Maths & Stats
  4. ^ Mark Watkins (2014). Solved Openings in Losing Chess. ICGA Journal, Vol. 37, No. 2
  5. ^ Losing Chess 1 e3 e6 by John Beasley, August 2014
  6. ^ Losing Chess: 1. e3 wins by BB+, OpenChess Forum, October 10, 2016
  7. ^ Quadratic field from Wikipedia
  8. ^ Dirichlet L-function from Wikipedia
  9. ^ BB's Rybka/Ippolit comparison by Zach Wegner, OpenChess General Forum, June 13, 2010
  10. ^ Hecke character from Wikipedia
  11. ^ Feb 12 version: Rybka 1.0 Beta / Fruit 2.1 document by Mark Watkins, OpenChess General Forum, February 12, 2011
  12. ^ Rybka evidence recapitulation by BB+, OpenChess Forum, January 03, 2012
  13. ^ A Gross Miscarriage of Justice in Computer Chess by Søren Riis
  14. ^ A Pairwise Comparison of Chess Engine Move Selections by Adam Hair, hosted by Ed Schröder
  15. ^ A Gross Miscarriage of Justice in Computer Chess (part one) by Søren Riis, ChessBase News, January 02, 2012

What links here?


Up one Level